Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution
Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution
Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution
Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution
Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution

Pixiu Figurine for powerful Feng Shui solution

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Fierce-looking Pixiu is a Chinese mythical, hybrid creature with the head and body of a winged dragon and the legs of a qilin.  A qilin is a Chinese mythical, hoofed animal that appears when a great sage passes.  It is also an omen of great prosperity.

Your Pixiu should go into the far left corner of your room from where you enter the room.  

This Pixiu is dark brown in color and measures 5-3/4 inches long by 3 inches wide by 3-7/8 inches high.  Comes in its own box.

The Pixiu has been dubbed a beast of fortune.  It is also known as a Tianlu or Bixie.  

In traditional Chinese lore, there are five powerful beasts: the phoenix, the dragon, the pixiu, the turtle and the quilin (aka as a kylin - sort of a mythical Chinese giraffe).  

The pixiu looks like a lion, but has a dragon's head, the body of a horse and the hooves and legs of a quilin.  It is able to fly.  

The Pixiu is the bearer of good fortune and happiness.  It also exorcises bad spirits from a room or person.  Unlike Quilin's, the Pixiu is an aggressive, determined protector.  It is popular practice in China to wear a jade pixiu for protection.  It is said: “touch a Pixiu once and you will get a good luck, twice you and will get money and treasure, and the on third time you will get power and position.”

There are 26 different representations of the pixiu.  It has incarnated 49 times.  

The pixiu relies on a diet of precious metals and gemstones.  

One of the feng shui rules regarding the placement of a pixiu indoors is that you must not point it towards the front door.  Nor towards a mirror as mirrors cause a Pixiu to feel nervous.  Also, it should not lean against your bed.

In Chinese mythology, the Dragon King has nine children: Qiuniu, Yazi, Chaofeng, Pulao, Suanni, Bixi, Bi’an, Fuxi and Pixiu.  Dragons influence the weather and the oceans.  Dragons symbolize power and dignity.  Perhaps that is why the Chinese refer to themselves as “descendants of the dragon.”